Statistical Process Improvement
Georgetown University
 

Teach One Assignment


 

We rely on a method typically used in training of medical residents: "Learn one, do one, teach one."  Each student is expected to not only learn the concepts in the course, and do the assignments, but also teach a portion of the course. This active participation in teaching helps students learn the concepts in the course in more depth.  The best way to learn a topic is to teach it.  Students are expected to teach by preparing a brief video. Students select which topic they wish to teach.  They can teach about any aspect within the topic.  Typically students teach how to do the assignment in the week's topic.  Student's videos should be reviewed by the instructor prior to release to others.

Alternative

In general, posting the video establishes your professional credentials in the social web and is encouraged by the instructor and the program. Some students may have reservations. Students who do not wish to post their video to a public domain should contact the instructor for an alternative.  These alternatives include posting under an alias, post and remove the video after class ends, or convert the video to flash and email the flash file to the students in class.   Do not email the video. 

Video Preparation

In several assignments you are asked to prepare videos.  Following tools are needed for preparing an online project presentation:

  1. A microphone is necessary to narrate your slides.  Please do not rely on built in microphones for portable computers.
  2. You can capture screen shots and insert it into your slide presentation using Command and Print Screen keys.  MAC Users►
  3. We prefer that you narrate the slides.  Narrate your slides or use other video making software.  Narrate►  Free Camstudio►  Camtasia►  SWF► IMovie►
  4. After narration go through the slides and remove excess words.  Do not keep sentences, keep only minimal set of key words that guide the presentation.
  5. Convert the narrated slides to a video format that can be uploaded to the web. If MAC user, this is typically accomplished by saving in a format acceptable by the web site you are uploading to. No talking heads or images of yourself should be included.
  6. Upload your narrated slides. We prefer U-Tube.  Author Stream► U-Tube►
  7. Put within the description of the file upload the following statement:  "This presentation was prepared as part of the HAP xxx course on xxx taught by xxx at George Mason University  Department of Health Administration and Policy."  Add a sentence about you to the description, e.g. xxx is a student in xxx field graduating in xxx..  Keep in mind that the work you are uploading will remain on the web for years to come and will help shape your career. 
  8. Share your narrated slides publicly so all students in the class can view it.  Use blackboard to email the link to everyone in class. 

Effective Videos

Modern health systems administrators must present their ideas effectively.  Effective presentation includes:

  1. Use appropriate content. Managers are often called upon to give voice to customers concerns. This is best done through use of multi-media. 
  2. Have a consistent style (the same font, capitalization policy, color, and size through out the video).
  3. Make one, and only one, point per slide. 
  4. Do not write sentences in slide, write a few words that could guide the viewer. 
  5. Make sure all texts on slides are readable, even after compression to fit the video requirements.  A U-tube video reduces Power Point slides to 1/4 of their original size.  Phone views have additional reductions.  Keep the font size larger than 36 points.
  6. Make sure the narration is clear and continuous.  Occasional hiccups are ok, keep them they add color. 
  7. Set compression levels high enough to be understood in a noisy room. 
  8. Be brief.  Do not exceed 10 minutes. If you need more time, make multiple videos. 

Rubric for Evaluation of Your Presentation

Criteria

Unacceptable

(65%)

Needs Improvement (75%)

Competent

(85%)

Exemplary

(100%)

Presentation posted to YouTube and embedded within the course on time.  (10 Points Possible)

More than 1 week late or presentation steps not completed.

(0 Points)

 

 

Presentation is exceptionally well organized, thorough, posted appropriately.

(10 Points)

The presentation is visually appealing and including clear graphics, images that are appropriate, code examples, and consistent font.

(20 Points Possible)

The presentation is not visually appealing. Fonts are too small.  Voice is poor quality recording. Too many points per slide. 

(0 Points)

The presentation is reasonably visually appealing but there are issues with graphics, images, code, and/or font consistency.  

(7 Points)

The presentation is visually appealing.  Font is consistently large size.  Color use is judicious.  One point per slide.

(13 Points)

The presentation is exceptionally visually appealing and the use of imagery is utilized well.     

(20 Points)

The information contained within the presentation is accurate, relevant, and provides instruction effectively to others

(30 Points Possible).

The presentation does not include information that is accurate, relevant and effectively provides instruction to others.

(0 Points)

There are major inaccuracies in the presentation.   Corrections were not done before posting

(10 Points). 

Inaccuracies in presentation were corrected before posting.

(20 Points)

The presentation exhibits excellent information that is accurate, relevant and effectively provides instruction to others (30 Points).

The presentation evokes responses, ratings, and comments from other classmates.

(25 Points Possible)

The presentation does not evoke positive ratings and comments from others (0 Points).

The presentation evokes a few ratings, and positive comments from others.  But no response from the author to the comments (15 Points).

The presentation evokes some responses, ratings, and comments from other classmates and response from the author (20 Points).

The presentation evokes positive ratings and comments from other classmates and timely response from author (25 Points).

 

 
Copyright 1996 Farrokh Alemi, Ph.D. Most recent revision 08/03/2018.  This page is part of the course on Statistical Process Control.